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Lichen: Leptogium brebissonii

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Leptogium brebissonii: note the ridges

Leptogium brebissonii: note the ridges

Leptogium brebissonii showing folds

Leptogium brebissonii showing folds

Leptogium brebissonii general view

Leptogium brebissonii general view

Vice County Web Map Leptogium-brebissonii

Vice County Web Map Leptogium-brebissonii

Name: Leptogium brebissonii Mont. (1840)
Pronunciation: Leptogium brebissonii
Conservation Evaluation: Near Threatened, Nationally Scarce, International Responsibility.
Body Type: Crustose, foliose, and gelatinous
Description: A gelatinous lichen with distinct wavy ridges (whether wet or dry) covered with coarse brown grain-like isidia. The thalline colour varies from grey-black when dry to taking on a green colour when wet and jelly-like. The lower surface is similar to the upper, but paler. It lacks a tomentum. Apothecia have not been recorded in Irish specimens.
Chemical Tests: No spot tests.
Nature Notes: This is a rare species, found in wet woodlands on deciduous trees. It has a preference for basic bark. It also occurs on calcareous rocks. Mainly confined to west Cork and Kerry, parts of Mayo and the Hazel woods of the Burren.
Vice county distribution map: See Map
Link: Map this species on the Lichen Survey
Other species recorded in Ireland:

  • Leptogium biatorinum (Nyl.) Leight.
  • Leptogium britannicum P.M.Jørg.& P.James
  • Leptogium burgessii (L.) Mont.
  • Leptogium cochleatum (Dicks.) P.M.Jørg.& P.James
  • Leptogium cyanescens (Rabenh.) Körb.
  • Leptogium diffractum Kremp.ex Körb.
  • Leptogium gelatinosum (With.) J.R.Laundon
  • Leptogium hibernicum Mitchell ex P.M.Jørg.
  • Leptogium juressianum Tav.
  • Leptogium lichenoides (L.) Zahlbr.
  • Leptogium massiliense Nyl.
  • Leptogium palmatum (Huds.) Mont.
  • Leptogium plicatile (Ach.) Leight.
  • Leptogium schraderi (Ach.) Nyl.
  • Leptogium subtile (Schrad.) Torss.
  • Leptogium tenuissimum (Dicks.) Körb.
  • Leptogium teretiusculum (Wallr. )Arnold
  • Leptogium turgidum (Ach.) Cromb.

Text and images © Paul Whelan, 2009.